Posts Categorized: Greg Hunter

Posted by & filed under Greg Hunter, USAWatchdog.com.

Last Friday, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) said 200,000 new jobs were created which dropped the unemployment rate to 8.5%.  Break out the party hats and champagne, we’ve finally hit bottom and are heading back up!  That’s the way the mainstream media (MSM) reported it, and in a campaign year, President Obama took a victory lap.   Reuter’s reported Obama said, “We’re making progress. We’re moving in the right direction. And one of the reasons for this is the tax cut for working Americans that we put in place last year. . . .When Congress returns they should extend the middle class tax cut for all of this year, to make sure we keep this recovery going.”

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Posted by & filed under Greg Hunter, USAWatchdog.com.

Dear Friends,

Please take time to read Greg Hunter’s latest posting on usawatchdog.com titled “Brace for Impact.”
Jim Sinclair

By Greg Hunter’s USAWatchdog.com

“Brace for Impact.”  I have thought about this economic collapse title for months.  I held onto it and figured I would know when the right time was to put it out there.  Today is the day.  Watching mainstream media (MSM) this weekend, you would think a one notch downgrade to America’s debt doesn’t really matter.  For example, former CNBC anchor Erin Burnett said Friday night on CNN the downgrade was “already priced into the market.”  The panel spoke as if the first U.S. debt downgrade in history was no big deal.  To that I say, positively absurd!

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Posted by & filed under Greg Hunter.

Greg Hunter’s USAWatchdog.com

Dear CIGAs,

More and more, I am finding stories produced by the mainstream media where the headline doesn’t jibe with the actual story that follows.  A USA Today (newspaper) story from the “Money” section yesterday is a great example of what I am talking about.  The headline read “Rising home sales point to a recovery.” On the very next line, just under the headline, the sub-headline read “Prices expected to keep falling 5% to 7% this year.” So we have a recovery but prices are falling?  What kind of a recovery is that?  The story goes on to say, “Sales of existing homes rose slightly in March but prices fell as the U.S. housing market continues to struggle.” (Click here to read the complete USA Today story.)What are the writer and editor at USA Today thinking or even trying to say?  This sounds like a story about a struggling real estate market and, in fact, all the evidence says the market is struggling.  It is certainly not recovering.

For evidence of a struggling real estate market, I look no further than the USA Today story.  It said, “Yet median prices in March dropped 5.9% from March 2010 to $159,600. Distressed homes accounted for 40% of sales, up from 35% a year ago, the NAR says. Distressed homes, such as those in foreclosure, typically sell at a 20% discount and pull down market prices.” Let me get this straight, “median prices in March dropped 5.9% from March 2010,” and the USA Today story is projecting prices will fall another “5% to 7% this year.” How is this a recovery in real estate?  On top of that, the “Rising home sales” are comprised of “40% distressed homes.” That’s up “35%” from last year.  That means 4 out of every 10 home sales are a foreclosure, and that seems to account for much of the increase in sales.  This is a recovery?

Mind you, I have done no research for this story.  I got all the material so far from the USA Today story.  Here’s the kicker.  The story ends by saying, “High unemployment and underwater mortgages are also hurting demand. Almost 25% of homeowners with a mortgage owe more than their homes are worth. ‘This means many households that want to move can’t,’ Dales says. (Paul Dales is a U.S. economist at Capital Economics.) Home sales may rise this year, but ‘a meaningful recovery is a few years away,’ he says.”

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Posted by & filed under Greg Hunter, USAWatchdog.com.

Courtesy of Greg Hunter’s USAWatchdog.com

Dear CIGAs,

Now that the mid-term elections are over, it is time to get back to reality.  Just because House Minority Leader John Boehner is taking over for Nancy Pelosi as Speaker of the House doesn’t mean the economy will get better.  Yes, the Republicans can now, pretty much, put the kibosh on the Obama agenda with big victories in the House and Senate, but is that enough to turn things around?  In a word–no.

The economy is functioning so poorly the Federal Reserve has widely telegraphed it will start another round of Quantitative Easing. It has been jokingly called “QE2” by the financial press.  What is QE2?  It is more Fed money printing to finance the country and revive the economy.  This kind of QE has never been done before in human history on this scale.  How much money will the Fed print?  The consensus among many economists is $500 billion, but that is just a start. Yesterday, Reuters warned, “Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke has said long-term asset purchases are an effective way to lower borrowing costs when rates are near zero, but a program of this size and scope is untested and many worry further expansion of the Fed’s balance sheet sets the stage for inflation or another asset bubble.”  (Click here for the complete Reuters story.)  

The Fed will start small but leave its plan of action open-ended.  In other words, it will commit to print as much as needed to buy treasuries and mortgage-backed securities to get the economy going again. One senior currency trader at HSBC, Daniel Hui, said on Bloomberg last week, “We think the eventual expansion of QE could be as large as $2 trillion if the Fed is serious about preventing deflation.”  (Click here for the entire Bloomberg interview.)

Citywire, a British publication, is one of many media outlets reporting that Goldman Sachs wants twice that amount of QE.  It reports, “The bank said that based on its own analysis the Fed ought to pump in a further $4 trillion in order to achieve the monetary easing the economy needs. . . “  (Click here for the complete Citywire story.)  

Former Bush economic advisor Marc Sumerlin talked about the upcoming Fed QE about a month ago on CNBC, “To me, it starts to get interesting at six to seven trillion dollars,” Sumerlin said.  (Click here for the CNBC interview and my post called “Could a Dollar Crash Be Coming Soon?”)  

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Posted by & filed under Greg Hunter, USAWatchdog.com.

Courtesy of Greg Hunter’s USAWatchdog.com

Dear CIGAs,

In the wake of the financial meltdown of 2008, the Federal Reserve announced it would buy mortgage-backed securities, or MBS.  The January announcement by the Fed said it would buy MBS from failed mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in the amount of $1.25 trillion.  At the time, the Fed said in a press release, “The goal of the program was to provide support to mortgage and housing markets and to foster improved conditions in financial markets more generally.”  (Click here for the full Fed statement.) It did provide “support” to the mortgage market, but did it also buy fraud and cover the banks that sold it?  The evidence shows, at the very least, it bought massive amounts of fraud.

We now know the Fed definitely bought valueless MBS because it has joined other ripped-off investors to demand Bank of America buy back billions in sour home debt.  A Bloomberg story from just last week, featuring Philadelphia Fed President Charles Plosser,  reports, “The New York Fed, which acquired mortgage debt in the 2008 rescues of Bear Stearns Cos. and American International Group Inc., has joined a bondholder group that aims to force Bank of America Corp.to buy back some bad home loans packaged into $47 billion of securities.  On the one hand, the Fed has “a duty to the taxpayer to try to collect on behalf of the taxpayer on these mortgages,” Plosser said today at an event in Philadelphia.”

Mr. Plosser lamented the “difficult spot” the central bank is in because it is both bank regulator and plaintiff.  He said, “Should we be in the business of suing the financial institutions that we are in fact responsible for supervising?” (Click here to read the complete Bloomberg story.) To that question, I ask shouldn’t the Fed have done a much better job of supervising the big banks in the first place?  The whole financial and mortgage crisis from sour securities to foreclosure fraud is in the process of blowing sky high.  The entire mess is clearly the biggest financial fraud in history!  It looks to me like the regulators were just supervising their pay checks being deposited into the bank.

And remember, the $1.25 trillion of mortgage-backed securities the Fed bought from Fannie and Freddie?  How much of that is fraud?  William Black, the outspoken Professor of Economics from the University of Missouri KC, says all the big banks were committing “major frauds”in the mortgage-backed security market.  Black says, at Citicorp, for example, “. . . 80% of the mortgage loans it sold to Fannie and Freddie were sold under false representations and warranties.” (Click here for the complete Black interview.) Black claims the frauds increased at some banks, and it is sill going on today!   (I admit I used this same video in a recent post.  I use it again, because it is the single most important and damning indictment of the big banks out there.  Professor Black defines the size of the entire fraudulent mortgage mess.)

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Posted by & filed under Greg Hunter, USAWatchdog.com.

Courtesy of Greg Hunter’s USAWatchdog.com

Dear CIGAs,

When I was an investigative reporter at the networks, the first question we would ask when trying to decide if we wanted to do a story was: How many?  How many people have been hurt by a defective product?  How many defective products of a certain kind were in use? How many dollars will it take to fix the problem?  In the case of the recent mortgage crisis – “Foreclosuregate,” the question of how many has been answered.It has been widely reported that there are a little more than 60 million home mortgages in the Mortgage Electronic Registry System (MERS).  If every one of the 60 million mortgages are worth $100,000, that would mean a total of at least $6 trillion in home mortgages that are electronically filed.  In MERS, there is no physical written record of a “Promissory Note.”  In almost all states, you need that original “Note” to prove ownership of a home.  That means in almost every single state, the banks cannot legally foreclose on your home without this document.  Some say the loan documents were lost on purpose because the bankers did not want their massive fraud to see the light of day.  Whether or not the “Notes” were lost on purpose or accident, the fact is the original “Notes” are nowhere to be found.  That is what the “Robo Signing” part of the story is all about.  It has been widely reported that “foreclosure mills” were creating massive amounts of counterfeit Promissory Notes so banks could legally foreclose on homeowners.

In the post I did earlier this week called “The Perfect No-Prosecution Crime,” I laid out several layers of fraud and white collar crime of mortgage and foreclosure fraud.  The lack of the Promissory Note is the biggest of all the problems in this chain of chicanery.  Here’s why.  A Promissory Note is a financial instrument.  It is in the same family as a Federal Reserve Note.  For example, if you copied a $100 bill and then tried to spend that copy in a store, because you lost the original, is it still money?–Of course not. You need the original financial instrument (in this case, $100 Federal Reserve Note) to make a legal transaction in a store.  The same is true for a Promissory Note. You need the original Promissory Note to legally complete a foreclosure.  A counterfeit, or copy, of a Promissory Note is not a financial instrument, just like a counterfeit or copy of a $100 bill is not a financial instrument!

Can you see how big this problem really is for the banks?  This is $6 trillion in real estate that fat cat bankers cannot legally prove they own. Likewise, that means trillions of mortgage-backed securities HAVE NO BACKING.   I think this is the biggest financial fraud in history.  This was not an accident made by someone pressing the wrong button or a few documents that weren’t handled properly, but fraud on a massive scale that took years and tens of thousands of people to pull off.  Ironically, this is all playing out against a backdrop of outrageous Wall Street pay.  This year the big banks are going to pay a record $144 billion!  (Click here for more on that story.)

One of my regular readers thinks Congress can simply pass a law and make all the crimes retroactively legal.  To that I said, “So Congress is going to change hundreds of years of real estate document law in each and every state? Along with IRS tax laws broken, trust laws broken, security laws broken and on top of that, make crimes retroactively not crimes anymore? That’s a lot even for Congress. I think the path of least resistance is more likely printing money to paper over the problem. . . . I hope you are wrong on Congress because if they do change all of these laws to comfort the criminal banksters, we might as well change the name of the country to the United States of Crime.”

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