Jim’s Mailbox

Posted at 10:15 AM (CST) by & filed under Jim's Mailbox.

People don’t realize that they are voluntarily giving up cash for digital. The less cash in circulation, the easier it will be for TPTB to make us go cashless. If we want to remain autonymous and without transaction records, we need to keep cash in circulation as long as possible. Everything else except for PMs are traceable, trackable and taxable. We all need to be using more cash, not less.

Jim

Jim/Bill,

The number of cash machines around the world fell last year as usage of paper money and coins continues to decline.

I can’t help but believe this is what the government wants.

Nobody really has cash anymore.  And by that, I mean money. We’ve all read articles how the current generation is living paycheck to paycheck and can’t afford to purchase homes anymore.

So, to keep the economy’s head above water, we corral the herd of Millennials, and everyone for that matter, into credit cards and subsequent debt overload.   Just to keep them buying….stuff.

But eventually, it will all come home to roost one day.

CIGA Wolfgang Rech

Number Of ATMs Falls Globally As Cash Continues To Die
May 20, 2019

The number of cash machines around the world fell last year as usage of paper money and coins continues to decline.

New research by banking consultancy RBR claims that the number of ATMs (automated teller machines) declined by 1% to 3.24m in 2018.

The fall comes amid declining usage of cash in developed markets globally. Sweden has already gone cashless and only 30% of transactions in the UK use cash today. Consumer group Which? said this month that the number of free cash machines in the UK declined by 1,700 in the first three months of the year.

Four of the world’s five biggest markets for cash machines registered a drop in numbers last year, RBR said. The number of ATMs fell in China, the USA, Japan, and Brazil.

“While the outcome was the same, each of these markets had its own reasons for the removal of ATMs,” RBR said. “In China, the swift adoption of non-cash payments has contributed to a similarly rapid fall in ATM installations. Branch closures have led to fewer bank ATMs in the USA.”

Growth in the number of ATMs in India, the fifth biggest market, slowed. Between them, China, the USA, Japan, Brazil, and India are home to over half of the world’s ATMs.

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Jim/Bill,

Not for anything, but it’s the concept that bothers me.

Promising to pay the holder in silver, then reneging.

A silver certificate dollar bill is a former circulation of paper currency that allowed for the direct exchange of silver.

Certificates were issued in place of the silver dollars because of the weight of the coins.

In 1963, the House of Representatives passed PL88-36, repealing the Silver Purchase Act and instructing on the retirement of $1 silver certificates. The act was predicated by a prospective shortage of silver bullion

Investors of silver were naturally upset at the passing of this law, which rendered their holdings worthless.

Never, ever trust anyone. Not even the government.

 

 

 

 

 

First they convince you that the paper promises are as good as silver…simply easier to carry around.

Then they say…Sorry Charlie.

CIGA Wolfgang Rech

What Is a Silver Certificate Dollar Bill Worth Today? (SLW, SVM)
May 20, 2019

A silver certificate dollar bill is representative of a unique piece of history. It no longer carries any monetary value as an exchange for silver, yet collectors still seek out the print. Its history dates back to the 1860s, and the certificate is a unique historical artifact representing a time period when the monetary structure of the United States was changing.

Silver-Certificate Dollar Bill

A silver certificate dollar bill is a former circulation of paper currency that allowed for the direct exchange of silver. This representative money allowed for the redemption of silver coins or raw bullion equal to the certificate’s face value. The certificate was used to back U.S. paper currency systems during the 1800s and 1900s. Other countries to have issued silver certificates include Cuba and the Netherlands.

Old Silver Dollar Certificates

The U.S. government began issuing silver certificate dollars in 1878. The certificates were initially issued in response to the Fourth Coinage Act of 1873. Enacted by the 42nd United States Congress, the act abolished the rights of holders of silver bullion to have their holdings converted into legal-tender dollars, ending bimetallism and effectively placing the United States on the gold standard. In 1874, the legal-tender status for silver certificates was removed for debts exceeding $5.

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