Jim’s Mailbox

Posted at 12:24 PM (CST) by & filed under Jim's Mailbox.

Bill,

This is truly unbelievable for the people that understand what is happening here. These are private holdings all bought with printed money. The entire system is propped up with fake money.

CIGA Werner

What’s your currency backed with?

Bill

The Bank of Japan Is Now A Top-10 Shareholder In 50% Of All Japanese Companies
April 17, 2019

While traders continue to obsess over daily “China trade deal optimism” headlines, Japan’s central bank is quietly nationalizing its entire market.

The last time we looked at how much of the stock market the Bank of Japan controls, we found that Kuroda’s central bank owned a stunning 75% of all Japanese ETFs as the central bank keeps buying stocks under its ultraloose monetary policy. Perhaps more importantly, as of March 2018, the Japanese central bank has also become a major shareholder in nearly 40% of listed companies. According to Nikkei calculations at the time, the bank was one of the top 10 shareholders in 1,446 listed companies out of 3,735.

More…

 

Jim,

The bail out fixed nothing.

Dave

After a $354 Billion U.S. Bailout, Germany’s Deutsche Bank Still Has $49 Trillion in Derivatives
April 17, 2019

On July 21, 2011, when the GAO released its audit of the Federal Reserve’s secret $16.1 trillion in bank loans during the financial crisis, a foreign bank ranked number 9 on the list of the largest borrowers. The loans went not just to the largest banks on Wall Street but to foreign derivative counterparties to the Wall Street banks. The foreign bank that ranked 9 on the list of the largest borrowers was Germany’s largest bank, Deutsche Bank, which took $354 billion in revolving loans from the U.S. Federal Reserve.

According to an article in the Financial Times last week “Germany’s federal and state governments have spent €70bn on bailing out banks since the financial crisis, according to an estimate by Gerhard Schick, head of lobby group Finance Watch.” The figure of €70bn is about 79 billion U.S. dollars. Why did the U.S. Fed throw $364 billion at one German bank when its country of origin has only reached in its pocket to the tune of $79 billion for all of its troubled banks? (Read on for the answer.)

More…