China’s “Weight”

Posted at 9:38 AM (CST) by & filed under Bill Holter.

A couple of topics for you today that are connected, obvious, yet not understood or even contemplated at this point. First, have you ever wondered why the names of many fiat currencies refer to “weight”? Such as the Peso, Peseta, Lira, or Pound amongst many others? This is similar to the names of various roads, like “Saw Mill Rd.”. It was named that because years ago there was actually a sawmill down the lane. These fiat currencies with “weighty” names started out as receipts for either gold or silver. They were convertible into a specific amount of metal when presented at a bank.

In essence these currencies were representations of physical metal since they were redeemable but far easier to carry around due to the lack of weight. In today’s jargon, paper currencies that were redeemable in specie were “derivatives” of the metals themselves. Then as time went on, the redeemability was cancelled and the currencies became true fiat, unbacked by anything except the credit worthiness of the issuer.

Over time, ALL currencies have become fiat and these currencies steadily devalued. I would ask, how can anyone have the thought these currencies can gain value versus gold or silver over a long period of time if they were originally spawned as derivatives? Can a derivative ever become more valuable than that it originated from? The answer of course is no and should be followed by another question; can a monetary guarantee from any government ever be more ironclad than that of physical metal itself?

More…