Consequences Cannot Be Avoided

Posted at 6:21 PM (CST) by & filed under General Editorial.

Dear CIGAs,

Only Gold can provide the required protection.

  1. The demise of the US dollar is inherent in its faux strength caused by international debt money flows.
  2. Hyperinflation is now set in cement. Citi last week, AGM today – all will come home to roust by economic law.

At .8900 on the USDX the argument that China cannot sell dollar or dollar denominated instruments starts to dissolve.

This then is true for every other nation whose central bank has expressed a desire to diversify their currency holdings.

This same argument applies to US treasury instruments.

The fundamentals of the US dollar are horrendous, exceeding the problems of the euro by orders of magnitude.

Hyperinflation is the natural outcome of the unprecedented, over the top, mad, mad bailouts of all the near and dear politically.

What Effect Will Hyperinflation Have?
September 22, 2008
Avery Goodman

(Excerpts From Article)

“For America, like 1920s Germany, the hyperinflationary trigger will not come from within the nation. It will come from outside. Eventually, China, Japan, and/or some other nation, will see the endlessly increasing American deficit spending as a threat to the viability of the U.S. dollar. In response, they will reduce their purchases of treasury bills. This will bring America to her knees. Indeed, there is already talk, in China, about the danger of keeping Chinese foreign reserves predominantly in the form of U.S. dollar denominated treasury bills and bonds. The Chinese are talking about diversifying away from the U.S. dollar. This will happen, eventually, no matter what we do. It is not a matter of “if”, but, rather, of when.”

“At minimum, the U.S. dollar will depreciate by the amount by which the Federal balance sheet is corrupted by the toxic mortgage paper. Most frightening is the prospect of giving Hank Paulson, the prior Chairman of Goldman Sachs, one of the key creators of the toxic mortgage instruments that have caused the credit crisis, unlimited discretion in doling out $700 billion in bailouts, without any possibility of judicial review. Doing that assures that the money is used in the most inefficient and nepotistic manner. It will bring us deeper into hyperinflation.

We can rationally expect that the US dollar will lose about 75% of its value, within 2-3 years. Cash in the form of government and/or corporate bonds, money in CDs and other bank accounts, will be hit the hardest. “

Full Article…

Defining the Components of a Hyperinflationary Great Depression
Deflation, Inflation and Hyperinflation.

Inflation generally is defined in terms of a rise in general prices due to an increase in the amount of money in circulation. The inflation/deflation issues defined and discussed here are as applied to goods and services, not to the pricing of financial assets.

In terms of hyperinflation, there have been a variety of definitions used over time. The circumstance envisioned ahead is not one of double- or triple- digit annual inflation, but more along the lines of seven- to 10-digit inflation seen in other circumstances during the last century. Under such circumstances, the currency in question becomes worthless, as seen in Germany (Weimar Republic) in the early 1920s, in Hungary after World War II and in the dismembered Yugoslavia of the early 1990s.

The historical culprit generally has been the use of fiat currencies — currencies with no asset backing such as gold — and the resulting massive printing of currency that the issuing authority needed to support its system, when it did not have the ability, otherwise, to raise enough money for its perceived needs, through taxes or other means.

Foster (see recommended further reading at the end of this issue) details the history of fiat paper currencies from 11th century Szechwan, China, to date, and their consistent collapses, time-after-time, due to what appears to be the inevitable, irresistible urge of issuing authorities to print too much of a good thing. The United States is no exception, already having obligated itself to liabilities well beyond its ability ever to pay off.

Here are the definitions:

Deflation. A decrease in the prices of goods and services, usually tied to a contraction of money in circulation.

Inflation. An increase in the prices of goods and services, usually tied to an increase of money in circulation.

Hyperinflation: Extreme inflation, minimally in excess of four-digit annual percent change, where the involved currency becomes worthless. A fairly crude definition of hyperinflation is a circumstance, where, due to extremely rapid price increases, the largest pre-hyperinflation bank note ($100 bill in the United States) becomes worth more as functional toilet paper/tissue than as currency.

More…