In The News

Posted at 4:16 PM (CST) by & filed under In The News.

Dear CIGAs, 

The last pillar required for a massive gold move is the 30 year USA long bond breaking below its 35 year up trend line.

The most important points: 

“America is bankrupt. American government bonds are extremely overvalued. “The world’s last bubble.” America is in debt for over 13.000 billion (13 trillion) dollar and adds a 1.000 billion dollar debt each year. According to Rogers this can not continue for long. Therefore, he went short in long-term US goverment bonds. “These bonds have peaked.” By the way: Rogers owns Dutch government bonds. “They are safe.”

“The fact that the dollar is gaining rapidly is only temporary”, Rogers says. “All hedge funds were short on the dollar and because of the appreciation of the dollar there is a short squeeze for the dollar. Managers have to close thier positions and they have to buy dollars instead.” “This is temporary, within a year you have to get rid of the dollar. Fundamentally it is a drama.” 

Jim Rogers: America is bankrupt (English version)

America is bankrupt, according to investment legend Jim Rogers. “The American government bonds are the world’s last bubble and the price of commodities has to increase.”

Charismatic
The famous and charismatic investor, guru if you will, Jim Rogers, visited ABN Amro Netherlands last Friday. RTL Z was at ABN headquarters as well and recorded a number of statements, investment tips and opinions about the world economy.

Rogers
During the seventies Jim Rogers (66) managed a successful hedge fund with George Soros. After that, he traveled and went into commodities. Click here for the wikipedia entry for Rogers. 

Last Friday Rogers went at it in front of a roomful of ABN private banking clients. We had an exclusive 15-minute interview with Rogers.

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Jim Sinclair’s Commentary

More from Pakistan. The drones did it. 

Pakistan condemns U.S. missile strikes
SAEED SHAH
November 3, 2008 at 10:39 PM EST

ISLAMABAD – Tensions increased between Pakistan and the United States Monday when President Asif Zardari and other officials roundly rebuked American military commander General David Petraeus over U.S. missile strikes inside Pakistan.

Gen. Petraeus, credited with pulling Iraq away from the brink, has now been charged with developing a strategy to rescue the war in Afghanistan. He has overall charge of the Middle East and Central Asia, including Iraq and Afghanistan, as head of U.S. Central Command, and made Pakistan his first visit to the region.

Pakistan’s co-operation is considered vital if the Taliban insurgency in Afghanistan is to be quelled, but Islamabad has been incensed by U.S. missile attacks inside its territory against suspected militants. 

Mr. Zardari told Gen. Petraeus, according to a statement issued by the President’s office, that “continuing drone attacks on our territory, which result in loss of precious lives and property, are counterproductive and difficult to explain [for] a democratically elected government. It is creating a credibility gap.” on those bombing drones.

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Jim Sinclair’s Commentary

When the lower rate is so desirable I imagine the feeling among regulators, officials and of course the obedient brown nose media is that of “who cares.”

Note there is no media coverage of the strong doubt remaining amongst rational people that Lie-bor, as a tool of the bankers, does the necessary in the best interest of those who report their cost of dollars that constitute the much watched Libor rate.

Maybe they will declare Libor at ½ percent soon.

London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR)

Definition:
Interest rate at which the London banks are willing to offer funds in the inter-bank market. LIBOR is the average of rates which five major London banks are willing to lend $10 million for a period of three or six months, and is the benchmark rate for setting interest rates for adjustable-rate loans and financial instruments.

Link…

 

Bankers Cast Doubt On Key Rate Amid Crisis
By CARRICK MOLLENKAMP

 LONDON — One of the most important barometers of the world’s financial health could be sending false signals.

In a development that has implications for borrowers everywhere, from Russian oil producers to homeowners in Detroit, bankers and traders are expressing concerns that the London inter-bank offered rate, known as Libor, is becoming unreliable.

Libor plays a crucial role in the global financial system. Calculated every morning in London from information supplied by banks all over the world, it’s a measure of the average interest rate at which banks make short-term loans to one another.

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Lie-bor?
by Jeffrey Cane  Apr 16 2008

Questions grow about a major rate.

One of the arcane financial acronyms that has gained much prominence over the course of the credit crisis is Libor-the London interbank offered rate. It is the average interest rate when banks make short-term loans to one another.

It is one of the most important credit benchmarks, used by banks and financial institutions around the world.

Carrick Mollenkamp of the Wall Street Journal reports that there are growing suspicions that some banks may be underreporting the rates they are paying for short-term loans, undermining the accuracy of the Libor. 



His report is a startling revelation. If the Libor is viewed as unreliable, the credit crisis may be much worse than previously thought, with borrowers receiving loans tied to the index getting a cheaper rate than they should.

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Jim Sinclair’s Commentary

Brokerage full service retirement plans will be retired before you will. Gold is all that will protect your retirement.

Lehman Good-for-Retirement Notes Worth Pennies for UBS Clients
By Bradley Keoun and David Scheer

Nov. 3 (Bloomberg) — UBS AG, Switzerland’s largest bank, faces dozens of claims in the U.S. from clients who bought “100 percent principal protected notes” issued by Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. that are now almost worthless.

Six attorneys hired to represent clients in the cases say UBS brokers touted the so-called structured notes as low-risk investments and failed to emphasize they were unsecured obligations of Lehman, which filed for bankruptcy in September. State regulators are fielding so many calls about Lehman’s notes they’re considering a task force to investigate the sales, said Rex Staples, general counsel for the North American Securities Administrators Association Inc., a group of 67 state and provincial regulators based in Washington.

“The sales pitches were that it’s good for retirement accounts, and good for the safe, fixed-income part of people’s portfolios as an alternative to owning stocks, because it’s less risky,” said Seth Lipner, a lawyer in Garden City, New York, hired by two holders of Lehman notes sold by UBS, including a 65- year-old accountant who says he lost $1.4 million in retirement savings. “Of course, it turned out to be more risky.”

Any awards for investors would add to the financial industry’s burgeoning costs for compensating individuals who bought supposedly safe investments that crumbled in the credit crunch. Banks and securities firms, including Zurich-based UBS, Citigroup Inc. and Merrill Lynch & Co., already have had to swallow more than $3.6 billion in fines and market losses on auction-rate securities they had to buy back from clients under orders from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and regulators in New York, Massachusetts and other states.

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