In The News Today

Posted at 7:05 PM (CST) by & filed under General Editorial, In The News.

Jim Sinclair’s Commentary

A small warning: Libor was caught fabricating its data on April 16th 2008. Who knows what lies behind the Libor door when a big lie would be very appreciated by the honest population of Wall Street.

“This game of “smoke and mirrors” took a big blow today with an article that you probably didn’t hear about today. CNBC “bubble-land” TV wouldn’t dare bring this to your attention. The WSJ and Bloomberg reported today that the Libor rate is being misquoted by banks. The Libor is set on the marketplace based on what the banks tell them they paid to borrow. This rate is not set by regulators. The Libor rate is set on trust.

So the banks are lying and saying they are paying a lower rate when they really paid a higher lending rate.

The British Bankers’ Association will speed up the review of the process by which money-market rates are set daily amid concern that some contributors are providing misleading quotes.

The global credit squeeze has raised concern lenders have been manipulating the so-called fixing process to prevent their borrowing costs from escalating, the Bank for International Settlements said in March. Participants have complained about whether banks are submitting accurate information, said Angela Knight, chief executive of the London-based BBA.”
–April 16, 2008

The Libor Lies: Smoke and Mirror Games Continue
Bloomberg
Wednesday, April 16, 2008

Well it was rally time today as the market continues to try to convince itself that the worst is behind us.

I find Wall St. fascinating because so much of it is a game of psychology. Dr. Robert Shiller from Yale describes financial bubbles as mainly being a psychological event. Bubbles tend to start with excitement and profits, are fueled by manias, and then crash in a panic. In between the cycles you will see moments of denial as the people who got in too late refuse to accept that they were the last sucker at the top. Today’s housing market and tech are good examples of this.

I view the stock market right now as being more psychological in how it reacts to news versus your old school technical market. There was a time in the markets where earnings were what mattered and markets were much more predictable as a result.

Today we have a much different market. You have financial TV news networks influencing investment decisions with 100 talking heads that have 100 different opinions. Today’s market also has a much larger pool of short sellers which can make the market move more violently up or down. Finally and most importantly in today’s market you have the the “financial innovation” of Wall St.

This new environment makes things very confusing for the average investor because there is so much information to digest. Its gotten to the point where its almost impossible for any investor(including myself) to predict where we are heading on a short term basis. However, in the long term, fundamentals ALWAYS come back to the market and stocks are then priced appropriately to earnings. Nasdaq 5000 ring a bell?

IMO, Financial innovation’s have become the most dangerous change in the financial markets because it made the stock market more vague or “shady”. Wall St.’s existance is based on trust and confidence. Without trust you would have no financial system. Would you give your money to a bank that you didn’t trust would pay you back?

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